EHR

§170.315(g)(3) Safety Enhanced Design and Meaningful Use (and the ONC 2015 Certification)

§170.315(g)(3) Safety-enhanced design

As providers of usability testing and user experience services we know that one of the major advantages of electronic health records (EHRs) are their potential to increase patient safety by preventing, detecting and aiding in the recovery from human errors. ONC has set certification standards for safety-enhanced design (SED), making patient safety a primary focus in the design of an EHR.

Meaningful Use Stage 2 is Here! Safety-Enhanced Design testing takes time!

ONC Meaningful Use Certification logo 2014 Edition

CMS and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) have established standards and certification criteria that EHRs must use in order to successfully capture and calculate objectives for Stage 2 of Meaningful Use. These new standards and certification criteria now in effect.

Guest Blog: Designing with the patient in mind

This week we are proud to publish a short synopsis of the Masters thesis project of Alyssa Costino. Alyssa conducted and reported on the use of EHR systems from the patient perspective -- something that isn't being done often enough.

The Electronic Medical Record: Designing with the Patient in Mind
A thesis project designed by Alyssa Costino
MFA Computer Graphics Design ‘12
Rochester Institute of Technology

Usability and User-Centered Design: A reminder to members of the EHR Developers Association

The Electronic Health Record Association (EHR Association), a non-profit association of more than 40 EHR companies, created an electronic health record (EHR) Developer Code of Conduct, which aims to encourage transparency and collaboration among EHR developers, as well as developers, providers, and industry stakeholders. The latest version of the code of conduct is available as a pdf here: http://bit.ly/13A1oLc

On the first page, the very first item (after a general statement) is Patient Safety.
The code says:

Top 10 Healthcare Usability Myths Debunked

Top 10 EHR Usability Myths - Debunked

Here are the Top 10 Healthcare Usability Myths Debunked

Myth # 1 Clinicians are uncomfortable with technology and just need more training.

Fact: Current HIT systems often don’t fit the way end users think and work.

Myth # 2 Put it all on 1 screen to make it easier to use.

Fact: Developers need to understand workflows and tasks to know what information is needed.

Myth # 3 Whoever has the Most features wins.

Fact: Vet your current feature set. Less may be more.

Physician Views on EHRs -- Mixed and Complex

A newly published survey of 1,200 physicians nationwide by the Watertown, Mass.-based athenahealth, which specializes in providing cloud-based based services for electronic health record (EHR), practice management, and care coordination, is revealing a mixed bag of opinions among doctors regarding how well electronic health records (EHRs) are working for them, with a range of views about the efficacy, cost-benefit analysis, and usability, of EHRs. Meanwhile, attitudes towards government involvement in healthcare have become more positive in the past year.

Usability Testing of Electronic Health Record systems EHRs

User-Centered Design: Helping users become Effective, Efficient, and Satisfied

We recommend that EHR vendors follow the ISO 9241-11 standard. ISO-9241 Part 11: (1998) pertains to the extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with Effectiveness (Task completion by users), Efficiency (Task on time) and Satisfaction (responded by user in term of experience) in a specified context of use (users, tasks, equipment & environments).

Summative testing

Summative Usability Evaluations of EHRs

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has released a set of new certification and meaningful use requirements for electronic health records (EHRs). These require that EHR vendors include evidence of user-centered design and user test results in their certification submission. To be able to obtain the ONC certification (and meaningful use funding) EHR vendors must follow a formal User Centered Design (UCD) process and perform summative usability testing on specific areas of the product.

OSEHRA: Conducting Usability Evaluations for Meaning Use Stage 2 Funding

Healthcare Usability will be presenting at the OSEHRA conference

We are pleased to announce that our talk, "Conducting Usability Evaluations for Meaning Use Stage 2 Funding " was presented at the OSEHRA 2nd Annual Summit.

When: Friday, September 6, 2013 10:30am White Oak Rm B

Where:
Bethesda North Marriott Conference Center

For information on conducting and reporting on the §170.314(g)(3) Safety-enhanced Design Criteria for meaningful use stage two certification see:

The use of electronic health records can reduce the costs of outpatient care

Study shows EHRs save money on outpatient care

Use of electronic health records can reduce the costs of outpatient care by roughly 3 percent, compared to relying on traditional paper records.

That's according to a new study from the University of Michigan that examined more than four years of healthcare cost data in nine communities. The "outpatient care" category in the study included the costs of doctor's visits as well as services typically ordered during those visits in laboratory, pharmacy and radiology.

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ONC has a new certification mark!

ONC Certified HIT

The new mark for certified electronic health records technology was unveiled Wednesday and will appear on EHR products that have been certified by an ONC-Authorized Certification Body, indicating that the product meets the 2014 Edition Standards and Certification Criteria.

Eligible professionals and hospitals must demonstrate meaningful use of EHR technology that has been certified under the ONC Health Information Technology Certification Program to qualify for Medicare and Medicaid EHR incentive payments.

Healthcare Providers Aren't Happy With EHR Systems

The federal government is happy to point out that more than 50 percent of physicians and 80 percent of hospitals are using electronic health record (EHR) systems, with those users having received some $14.6 billion in meaningful use incentives initially allocated in the 2009 stimulus.

A Doctors view on the lack of usability in EHR systems

We found an article at KevinMD written by a cardiologist named David Mokotoff.

This article is a great read for gaining the perspective of an doctor that has had to deal with a number of the issues (mostly usability based) with some of the EHR systems he has been required to use. His frustration with the status quo is evidence that things need to change. EHR Vendors need to understand their end-users and establish a User-centered design approach.

Is English the second language of medical documentation?

English only?  Perhaps not the best solution for EHRs

In a recent article written by the American College of Physicians, Yul Ejnes suggests that although English is the first language of Medicine, it has become the second language of EHRs.

"How and why did this happen? Most of it stems from the morphing of the medical record from a clinical tool to an audit and billing tool. The focus is no longer on capturing the patient’s history, examination, test results, and the physician’s thought process. Instead, today’s goal is to record as many things that were said or done as one can in order to justify the highest billing code, meet the performance measure, earn a high quality score, and lawyer-proof the record – and to do so in as little time as possible."

HealthIT.GOV publishes EHR Adoption Dashboard

HealthIT Interactive Dashboard for Meaningful Use adoption rates

For some reason, everyone seems to like dashboards. Maybe it is because a lot of us can think better visually than we can with just text.

To help visual thinkers, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs found an interesting way to publish the data about the adoption and meaningful use of health information technology.

The information displayed in their visual dashboard is derived from data published by CMS.

EHRs are changing the way doctors behave

Researchers from Stanford University Department of Biomedical Informatics and Harvard Medical School examined the case of a two-year-old boy who died after clinical staff overrode EHR alerts about potential drug allergy cross-reactivity. Prior to inappropriately administering a diuretic to the patient, the clinical staff overrode more than 100 alerts over the course of one month.

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The Usability People work with you on improving the Usability of Healthcare IT.

For expert 2015 ONC Safety-enhanced Design (aka Usability) evaluation of your EHR: contact The Usability People

The Usability People

Together we may save a life! #SafeHealthIT