NIST

Improving Clinical Workflow in Ambulatory Care: Implemented Recommendations in an Innovation Prototype for the Veteran’s Health Administration

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) report titled “Incorporating Health Information Technology into Workflow Redesign”
recommended conducting human-factors workflow analyses in health care settings prior to technology implementation. In addition, the National Institute
of Standards and Technology (NIST) presented targeted recommendations from human-factors workflow methods that could be used in ambulatory

Proposed Expansion of the Safety-Enhanced Design requirements for Meaningful Use Stage 3

ONC document on Federal Register


Click here for Update: The Final Rule for the 2015 edition certification has been released.

On page 191 of the 431 page document from ONC about the proposed changes to the Meaningful Use program for Stage 3, ONC begins to identify several significant changes to the Safety-enhanced Design (a.k.a.usability) testing requirements.

Integrating Electronic Health Records into Clinical Workflow: An Application of Human Factors Modeling Methods to Ambulatory Care

From the executive summary, “These recommendations provide a first step in moving from a billing-centered perspective (i.e., focusing
on ensuring maximum and timely reimbursement) to a clinician-centered perspective where the EHR design supports clinical cognitive work,
such as moving from an initial working diagnosis to a formal diagnosis for a complex patient. These recommendations point the way towards a “patient visit
management system,” which incorporates broader notions of supporting workload management, and supporting the flexible flow of patients and tasks.”

Top 10 Healthcare Usability Myths Debunked

Top 10 EHR Usability Myths - Debunked

Here are the Top 10 Healthcare Usability Myths Debunked

Myth # 1 Clinicians are uncomfortable with technology and just need more training.

Fact: Current HIT systems often don’t fit the way end users think and work.

Myth # 2 Put it all on 1 screen to make it easier to use.

Fact: Developers need to understand workflows and tasks to know what information is needed.

Myth # 3 Whoever has the Most features wins.

Fact: Vet your current feature set. Less may be more.

Usability: The future of EHRs

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is developing a framework to think about the use of EHRs in relation to adverse events and patient safety. Lana Lowry, NIST project lead on usability and human factors for health IT, believes that in addition to a set of technical requirements for functionality, systems need to have the same set of user requirements for how a user performs with the system.

NIST Guide to the Processes Approach for Improving the Usability of Electronic Health Records

This document provides NIST guidance for those developing electronic health record (EHR) applications who need to know more about processes of user centered design (UCD).

http://www.nist.gov/itl/hit/upload/Guide_Final_Publication_Version.pdf


The Usability People work with you on improving the Usability of Healthcare IT.

For expert 2015 ONC Safety-enhanced Design (aka Usability) evaluation of your EHR: contact The Usability People

The Usability People

Together we may save a life! #SafeHealthIT